Jessica Silver

Psychotherapy, PsyD
Dr. Jessica Silver is a licensed clinical psychologist providing psychotherapy to culturally diverse adults. Her specialties include depression, anxiety, relationship difficulties and trauma. Outside of her private practice, she works as an attending psychologist at Montefiore Medical Center and she received her doctorate from Yeshiva University.
Specialties: General Mental Health, Trauma & PTSD, Relationship Issues
Finances: Accepts Aetna, Accepts Empire Blue Cross Blue Shield, Accepts Sliding Scale
Provider
Profile
“As a warm, compassionate therapist, I strive to create a safe space where my clients feel comfortable to openly express and explore the inner thoughts and feelings that are troubling them.”
What would you want someone to know about working with you?
As a warm, compassionate therapist, I strive to create a safe space where my clients feel comfortable to openly express and explore the inner thoughts and feelings that are troubling them. My ultimate goal is to empower my clients to live fuller, more satisfying lives. This starts by collaborating with clients to identify the underlying causes of their difficulties and establish their therapeutic goals. Through our work together, I help my clients tap into and further develop their inner strength and innate abilities, transforming them into skills they can use to better cope with emotional distress, improve relationships, overcome obstacles and achieve personal goals. I tailor my approach to each client's unique needs and work with them to actively restructure the patterns of thought and behavior that are keeping them stuck and unhappy, allowing them to move through life with a greater sense of freedom, clarity, confidence and purpose.
If there was one thing you wish people knew about the therapy experience who might be hesitant try it, what would that be?
I would tell them that therapy is a powerful process which facilitates profound personal transformation and that it absolutely is possible to create lasting and meaningful positive change in one’s life. There is something very special that happens when the client and therapist start to develop a trusting relationship. It gives the client the space and encouragement to discover and become in touch with parts of themselves that they may not have known were there. Bringing these hidden parts of the self into awareness allows the individual to access a fuller, more expanded range of emotional experiences and as a result, to become a more authentic and enlivened version of themselves.
What was your path to becoming a therapist? What inspired you to choose this profession?
I have always been deeply curious about the often mysterious workings of the human mind and am fascinated by what motivates and drives our behavior, thinking and desires as humans. After engaging with these questions on more of a cultural and societal level through my college work in anthropology and literature, I decided that I was interested in zooming in and shifting my focus from the global to the personal. I realized that I could better channel my intellectual energy and passion into understanding and helping real people in the world and therefore make a more meaningful impact on an individual level.
What do you think is the biggest barrier today for people seeking care?
I think our society still attaches significant stigma to seeking help for psychological problems, which can cause people to feel uncomfortable or embarrassed about seeing a therapist. You don’t need to have a clinical disorder to benefit from therapy. In fact, I think everyone can get something valuable from the experience, whether it’s gaining a deeper understanding of yourself or an outside perspective on your problems. I tell my clients that everyone goes through rough periods in life and that most of us can’t get through those stressful times alone. The truth is that we need support from others, and sometimes, getting that support from a non-judgmental, outside professional is preferable to relying on family and friends. I also tell my clients that it takes real courage and strength to reach out for help from a therapist, rather than being a sign of weakness.
“There is something very special that happens when the client and therapist start to develop a trusting relationship. It gives the client the space and encouragement to discover and become in touch with parts of themselves that they may not have known were there.”
Jessica practices at Alma
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