Julia Werman Zwerin

Psychotherapy, LMSW
Julia Werman Zwerin is a psychotherapist who works closely with her clients to resolve relationship issues, reduce emotional distress and explore feelings that may manifest as depression, unhappiness or anxiety. The primary goal is to overcome destructive patterns. Julia received her degree in Clinical Social Work from Hunter College School of Social Work.
Specialties: General Mental Health, Relationship Issues, Personal Growth
Finances: Accepts Out-of-Network, Accepts Sliding Scale
Provider
Profile
“I believe the most interesting, intimate and dynamic relationship we can have is the one we have with ourselves.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist? What inspired you to choose this profession?
My interest in therapy began in high school, when I was trained as a peer counselor and worked on a teen suicide hotline. Like many of my colleagues, I was the friend whom classmates confided in and looked to for advice. As a young adult in New York City, I began to explore my own history and behavioral patterns in therapy. Over the years I’ve explored numerous self-reflective and therapeutic modalities, through which I’ve developed a depth of understanding and compassion regarding human behavior. I am deeply fulfilled by the work I do, and I find that my clients recognize and appreciate our mutual investment and collaborative relationship.
What would you want someone to know about working with you?
I serve as guide and support to my clients as they explore learned patterns that are no longer serving them, and our work together is a collaborative process. In our initial session, clients share their concerns and goals, family history, pertinent relationships, work life, and any additional points of interest. Subsequent sessions are used to gradually navigate the past and recent history, and to piece together how a client’s childhood, adolescence and adult experiences have created coping mechanisms and have shaped their relationship patterns. We look at what is not serving them, and at what may be manifesting as anxiety, depression, and/or general dissatisfaction in life.
How does collaboration with other providers play into your work?
Increased self-care is often a by-product of therapy, and I encourage clients to be open to a variety of modalities they can benefit from. When a client needs support outside my area of expertise, I can refer that client to a solid and trusted group of practitioners. This includes psychiatrists, nutritionists, breathwork practitioners, meditation teachers, naturopaths, career counselors, and more.
What do you think is the biggest barrier today for people seeking care?
The cultural stigma that there may be something wrong with you if you “need” therapy is still a barrier to many who can benefit from it. We’re fortunate to live in a city that, to a great extent, celebrates personal growth; but not everyone has received this message from their families, cultures or communities of origin. My hope is that those who are experiencing emotional challenges will look past this stigma that still exists, and find the support they need.
If there was one thing you wish people knew about the therapy experience who might be hesitant try it, what would that be?
People frequently don’t understand why they behave the way they do, why they continue to get into troubling intimate relationships, stay in a job or career they no longer enjoy, or struggle with their family relationships. I believe the most interesting, intimate and dynamic relationship we can have is the one we have with ourselves. Once we begin to understand the motivation behind our feelings and behaviors, significant personal shifts and fulfillment begin to occur. This is what a good therapeutic relationship can provide, and it can be a life-changing experience.
“I am deeply fulfilled by the work I do, and I find that my clients recognize and appreciate our mutual investment and collaborative relationship.”
Julia practices at Alma
map to Alma