Raquela Adelsberg, RD
Raquela Adelsberg profile picture

Raquela Adelsberg

Nutritionist, RD

Raquela Adelsberg is a registered dietitian working with adults and children looking to better their health through nutrition. She specializes in gastrointestinal disorders and also offers general healthy nutrition counseling for clients of all ages. Outside of Alma, Raquela works at Mount Sinai Hospital, where she specializes in pediatric gastroenterology.
Specialties
Pediatrics
Weight Loss & Nutrition
Locations
Midtown East
Alma Office
Finances
$ $ $ $ $
$200-260
Accepts Out-of-Network
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Provider
Profile
“My role as a dietitian is to teach and guide people of all ages on how to best nourish themselves and, for people with illnesses, how food can work to heal.”
What was your path to becoming a nutritionist? What inspired you to choose this profession?
I became a dietitian because I was fascinated by how important food is to the human body and by the way food has the ability to cure people of various maladies. We spend so much of our day thinking about food, planning what to eat and eating, yet little thought is given to how we nourish ourselves. My role as a dietitian is to teach and guide people of all ages on how to best nourish themselves and, for people with illnesses, how food can work to heal.
What would you want someone to know about working with you?
My sessions are collaborative, so I work with clients to develop interesting and creative ways to help them eat to feel well. Whether it is a toddler with selective eating habits, a teenager with irritable bowel syndrome or an adult with Crohn’s Disease, together we develop a care plan that works for the individual. I believe in adding food rather than restricting it, knowing that different foods can be beneficial to different people.
Raquela Adelsberg photo 1
How does collaboration with other providers play into your work?
Collaboration with other professionals is an important part of working as a dietitian. Eating habits are often based on cultural and familial experiences. Studies indicate that there is a strong biological relationship between the brain and the GI tract, so for many clients, it is often important for me to partner with a mental health professional in order for the client to thrive.
What do you think is the biggest barrier today for people seeking care?
The biggest barrier today for people seeking help with nutrition is that conflicting information abounds in the press and media. In our current climate of dieting, fads, and cleanses, I work to make eating fun and pleasurable.
If you could pick one or two books that influenced your approach to therapy what would they be and why?
Any book written by my professor at NYU, Marion Nestle. I took her class on food policy in graduate school. Dr. Nestle writes about how the food industry influences decisions about what we eat. She taught me how to read nutrition news with a more critical eye. I try to impart this to my clients in order to help them make informed decisions about what they eat.
“In our current climate of dieting, fads, and cleanses, I work to make eating fun and pleasurable.”
Interested in speaking with Raquela?