Renée Daley

Psychotherapy, LCSW
Renee Daley is a psychotherapist with an interest in working with clients who have mood disorders, anxiety and depression, substance use, self-esteem or body-image issues, and those in high pressure work environments. Renee received her degree from Columbia University School of Social Work. She believes that her job is to help you become your best self however you define it.
Specialties: General Mental Health, Relationship Issues, Substance Use & Abuse
Finances: Accepts Out-of-Network
Provider
Profile
“While a lot has changed in the mental health space, stigma is still the largest barrier to seeking care. We are taught to suck-it up, keep it to ourselves, and move on. Why suck it up when you can do something about it?”
What was your path to becoming a therapist? What inspired you to choose this profession?
When I was younger I saw first hand how difficult it was for the people I loved to find the help they needed. Mental health was stigmatized and the information out there was fragmented. I wanted to ensure that everyone had access to the information they needed to make the right choice about their health. As someone who has gone through that myself I knew I could understand the challenge and help people through those difficult times.
What would you want someone to know about working with you?
I believe that you are the expert in your life and my job is to help you become your best self, however you define it. Life demands can get in our way and throw us off track. I am here to help you find the balance you are looking for. My approach is collaborative, client centered, and solution oriented. Each client is unique and sessions are tailored to the individual. I use a variety of techniques rooted in CBT, behavior modification, and problem solving therapy. Modalities for treatment include a mix of in-person and teletherapy sessions.
What do you think is the biggest barrier today for people seeking care?
While a lot has changed in the mental health space, stigma is still the largest barrier to seeking care. We are taught to suck-it up, keep it to ourselves, and move on. Why suck it up when you can do something about it? We are all doing the best we can with what we know. But we can also learn new things that improve our lives even more. There is nothing weak or wrong with needing help. It is about prioritizing yourself and saying you deserve more...and you do. We all do.
If there was one thing you wish people knew about the therapy experience who might be hesitant try it, what would that be?
People are hesitant for so many reasons – all of are them understandable. The unique part of therapy or meeting with a therapist is that it is unlike any relationship you have. It is judgement free, empathetic and completely about you and no one else. It is the only relationship you will have where there is no bias or influence. The focus is making sure you have the tools to live a happy and healthy life.
What excites you most about the evolving mental health landscape?
There is a significant cultural shift happening right now regarding how we publicly talk about mental health. People are opening up about their mental health history, what has helped them, and are encouraging others to do the same. I am excited about this shift in thinking because it shows that mental health is something we all face and we can take steps to feel better.
“The unique part of therapy or meeting with a therapist is that it is unlike any relationship you have.”
Renée practices at Alma
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