Rosie Barton, LMSW
Rosie Barton profile picture

Rosie Barton

Psychotherapy, LMSW

Rosie Barton is a Brooklyn-based psychotherapist and coach who offers the unique opportunity to engage both body and mind by walking or running outside during sessions. Her specialties include anxiety, depression, body image, relationships, and self-esteem. She received her Masters from NYU and has trained at the NYU Counseling Center, Blanton Peale Institute, and Cobb Psychotherapy.
Specialties
General Mental Health
Personal Growth
Relationship Issues
Locations
Downtown Brooklyn
Alma Office
Finances
$ $ $ $ $
$80-140
Accepts Out-of-Network
Cash
portrait photograph of provider
Provider
Profile
“Therapy is a thrilling encounter with your own self. By placing emphasis on the process, rather than just the outcome, you open yourself up to a landscape of self-discovery and understanding.”
What was your path to becoming a therapist? What inspired you to choose this profession?
I didn’t always know that I wanted to be a therapist. In fact, I was on a path toward working in the field of translation. I loved speaking another language, but knew after I translated parent-teacher conferences for a mother who didn’t speak English that it was the human and helping aspect that I was drawn to, not the act of translating itself. Leaving the field I spent all of college preparing for was a difficult decision, compounded by the feeling that I had “missed the boat” to become a therapist. Fortunately I had a support system that helped me understand that it’s never too late. Now I’m grateful for this winding path because it gives me a tremendous amount of compassion for my clients as they also pursue greater meaning and fulfillment in their lives.
What would you want someone to know about working with you?
My work looks different than what typically comes to mind when we think of therapy. That's because I'm passionate about incorporating movement and the outdoors into treatment. I've decided to focus on a practice that takes my sessions outside, walking or even running together. With that said, if you don't want to walk or run that day, we can always meet in my office — it's up to you! I believe there's much to be gained from thinking outside of the box and focusing on healing the whole person, in both body and mind.
Rosie Barton photo 1
If there was one thing you wish people knew about the therapy experience who might be hesitant to try it, what would that be?
Therapy isn’t only for people who are sick or unwell. There’s so much to be gained from consistently exploring your patterns of behavior, thought, and defenses. Therapy is a thrilling encounter with your own self. By placing emphasis on the process, rather than just the outcome, you open yourself up to a landscape of self-discovery and understanding. I believe it's unhelpful for a therapist to think of their clients as needing to be "fixed" or "cured." That can lead to clients feeling broken themselves. You already have so many resources and strengths, and the role of the therapist is to help you access those more effectively.
What excites you most about the evolving mental health landscape?
I’m a believer that one size doesn’t fit all and that seated therapy might not be the most effective approach for everyone. I’m most enthusiastic about the fact that there are tons of professionals who are exploring novel treatment methods. As a longtime runner, I was thrilled when I discovered Sepideh Saremi, a therapist in California who boldly incorporated movement into her therapeutic model, and ultimately mentored me in doing the same. The field has come a long way since Freud, and I’m constantly moved by the creative professionals who are widening our lens of what therapy has to look like.
What does a walking or running session with you look like?
After doing an intake session in which we discuss your history, goals, and confidentiality, you’ll have the opportunity to decide if you want to walk outside, run, or meet in the office during each session. We’ll meet at Alma or another location and take the session into Brooklyn Bridge Park or Prospect Park. You’ll have the opportunity to work through challenges, explore unhelpful thoughts and behaviors, and set goals to shift what isn’t working for you. Even if we’re running, the session isn’t designed to be a vigorous workout. Instead, it's a conversational pace that allows you to check in with how you feel in the present moment and pay attention to physical sensations, thoughts, and emotions as they arise.
“There's much to be gained from thinking outside of the box and focusing on healing the whole person, in both body and mind.”
Interested in speaking with Rosie?